A Family Farm Album

Farm and Land

A Family Farm Album: Frank Sadorus' Photographs : Farm and Land

Tapping for Maple Syrup
Frank and GWB tapping maple syrup.
A grove of sugar maples on the Sadorus farm provided the family with the opportunity to produce maple syrup for their personal use. Maple syrup is most often made from the sap of sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum), also known as hard maples. Nights with below-freezing temperatures followed by a rapid-warming trend from early to mid-morning the next day will usually result in a good sap run. Maples were tapped by boring into the tree using a carpenter's brace and wood bit. Evenly spaced hohles were bored around the tree trunk, with the number of holes depending on the diameter of the tree. The tapholes were slanted to allow the sap to run out. Tapered wood spiles or spouts were inserted into the tapholes to allow the sap to move from the tree into a pail hung under the spile.

Collection of the Illinois State Museum
ISM Accession #: 1987.001.229

Tapping for Maple Syrup

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A Family Farm Album: Frank Sadorus' Photographs : Farm and Land

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